The things we do for science...

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(Source: pleatedjeans)

Whenever I spot a book shop:

the-runewriting-dragon:

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ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

(Source: entulhodeimagens)

tastefullyoffensive:

[craigslist]

theangrygeek:

wtfevolution:

Hippos, evolution? Hippos?!

Making something that dangerous look that ridiculous is, indeed, a WTF.

theangrygeek:

wtfevolution:

Hippos, evolution? Hippos?!

Making something that dangerous look that ridiculous is, indeed, a WTF.

sciencealert:



Next time you go to the hospital to visit a relative, or have an appointment with your doctor, greet them with a fist bump: http://bit.ly/1o8faLL

sciencealert:

Next time you go to the hospital to visit a relative, or have an appointment with your doctor, greet them with a fist bump: http://bit.ly/1o8faLL
cute-overload:

We just got her a month ago and were told she never went outside….look what happened Friday.http://cute-overload.tumblr.com

cute-overload:

We just got her a month ago and were told she never went outside….look what happened Friday.
http://cute-overload.tumblr.com

mothernaturenetwork:

Your brain has a biological response to a good bookNew research reveals that reading a novel can ‘trick’ your brain and ‘transport you into the body of the protagonist.’

mothernaturenetwork:

Your brain has a biological response to a good book
New research reveals that reading a novel can ‘trick’ your brain and ‘transport you into the body of the protagonist.’

Social origins of intelligence in the brain

neurosciencestuff:

By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling — and beginning to answer — longstanding questions about how the brain works.

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The researchers found that brain regions that contribute to optimal social…

micdotcom:

More giant holes have formed in Siberia, here’s why

 It turns out that scary, mysterious gigantic black hole discovered by oil workers in Siberia several weeks ago might be even more concerning than we even thought.

In findings that have seriously alarmed environmental scientists, two more chasms have recently been discovered, leading experts to believe they’re part of an alarming trend.

Why scientists are worried about their origins | Follow micdotcom

ucresearch:

More efficient ways to lower CO2


The term carbon capture is talked about as a way to battle against climate change, but what exactly is it?  This recent NY Times video does a great job explaining it.

Basically, when a power plant burns fossil fuel such as coal, it releases gas into the air.  Carbon capture technology can single out the CO2 molecules in this gas before it leaves the smokestack.  The current process is to spray a chemical on the gas to separate the carbon dioxide so that it can be pumped underground.

This process is both expensive and can take up a third of the plant’s generated power known as parasitic energy.  Scientists are trying to find ways to use safer and energy efficient materials to reduce this issue.  The problem is that a wide array (millions!) of chemicals can bond with CO2, making the testing process quite complex.

UC Berkeley’s Berend Smit and his team have created a computer model to test out these materials in the virtual world.  So researchers can upload the molecular structure they want to test to a website and see how efficient it might be.  

You can read more about this project here.

amnhnyc:

On land, sunlight illuminates a world that’s bright and bursting with color. But in the ocean, light and color diminish as the water gets deeper. Take a look at what happens to light as it moves through the water, and how marine organisms have adapted.
Learn more in our traveling exhibition, Creatures of Light.  

amnhnyc:

On land, sunlight illuminates a world that’s bright and bursting with color. But in the ocean, light and color diminish as the water gets deeper. Take a look at what happens to light as it moves through the water, and how marine organisms have adapted.

Learn more in our traveling exhibition, Creatures of Light.  

jtotheizzoe:

Earth is definitely warming… thanks to this sick burn!

I know what you’re thinking. There’s no way you’re gonna watch seven minutes of C-SPAN2. You wouldn’t even watch seven minutes of C-SPAN1, amirite?!

What if I told you that contained within this seven minutes is the most epic smackdown of congressional climate science denial ever uttered in the halls of the U.S. Capitol? Perhaps the most sick and depressing call-out of those who refuse to accept science since John Oliver invited Bill Nye out on stage?  

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) is about to give that to you.

Here he is scolding climate conspiracy theorist, science denier, and recipient of more than $1 million from the fossil fuel industry, Sen. James Inhofe (R-Alternate Reality), after Inhofe blocked a resolution that would have simply acknowledged the reality of man-made climate change.

"The only place… where denial is anything credible any longer, is here in Congress, where the money from the fossil fuel industry still has a vicious effect."

If it weren’t such a dire issue, I’d be smiling. Thanks to Phil Plait for posting this.

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

A Wooden simulation of a water droplet as it impacts a body of water.

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