The things we do for science...

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Sep 1
curiosamathematica:

Cabbage exhibits a beautiful geometric pattern.

curiosamathematica:

Cabbage exhibits a beautiful geometric pattern.

Sep 1
futurescope:


Map of all devices connected via the internet
Redditor achillean writes:

I Pinged All Devices on the Internet, here’s a Map of them.
The data was generated using a stateless scanner used to create Shodan. A free, open-source scanner called Zmap is readily available for anybody that wants to do it themselves! And the map itself was generated using the Python matplotlib library.
It took about 5 hours to ping all IPs on the Internet, then another 12+ hours to generate the map.

[read more]
[John Matherly]

futurescope:

Map of all devices connected via the internet

Redditor achillean writes:

I Pinged All Devices on the Internet, here’s a Map of them.

The data was generated using a stateless scanner used to create Shodan. A free, open-source scanner called Zmap is readily available for anybody that wants to do it themselves! And the map itself was generated using the Python matplotlib library.

It took about 5 hours to ping all IPs on the Internet, then another 12+ hours to generate the map.

[read more]

[John Matherly]

Sep 1
emergentfutures:

Paul Higgins - very happy to be rated as part of this incredible group of people

brucesterling:

*There’s something to this, but if you take the trouble to hang out with actual futurists you’ll see that they don’t really do much of this…  On the contrary, they’d glance at that image on the bottom and go “Oh yeah, that’s the classic Detroit Rust Belt model.  That scenario was big during the 1970s Energy Crisis.”
The 40 highest authority Twitter profiles in the network are:
@iftf – Institute for the Future@WorldFutureSoc – World Future Society@rossdawson – Ross Dawson@gleonhard – Gerd Leonhard@DefTechPat – Patrick Tucker@Urbanverse – Cindy Frewen@VenessaMiemis – Venessa Miemis@cshirky – Clay Shirky@cascio – Jamais Cascio@bruces – Bruce Sterling@mitchbetts – Mitch Betts@frankspencer – Frank Spencer@futuryst – Stuart Candy@johnmsmart – John Smart@Geofutures – Josh Calder@ThomasFrey – Thomas Frey@doctorow – Cory Doctorow@heathervescent – Heather Schlegel@psaffo – Paul Saffo@MareeConway – Maree Conway@dunagan23 – Jake Dunagan@jenjarratt – Jennifer Jarratt@kevin2kelly – Kevin Kelly@wendyinfutures – Wendy L Schultz@patrickdixon – Patrick Dixon@Joi – Joi Ito@GreatDismal – William Gibson@futuristpaul – Paul Higgins@futuramb – P A Martin Börjesson@kristinalford – Kristin Alford@nraford – Noah Raford@avantgame – Jane McGonigal@DavidBrin – David Brin@jhagel – John Hagel@fastfuture – Rohit Talwar@singularityhub – Singularity Hub@singularityu – SingularityU@futureguru – Dr. James Canton@timeguide – Ian Pearson@FutureCon – Future Conscience
Read more: http://rossdawson.com/articles/futurists-twitter-analysis-network-centrality/#ixzz3BrJtP4IX

emergentfutures:

Paul Higgins - very happy to be rated as part of this incredible group of people

brucesterling:

*There’s something to this, but if you take the trouble to hang out with actual futurists you’ll see that they don’t really do much of this…  On the contrary, they’d glance at that image on the bottom and go “Oh yeah, that’s the classic Detroit Rust Belt model.  That scenario was big during the 1970s Energy Crisis.”

The 40 highest authority Twitter profiles in the network are:

@iftf – Institute for the Future
@WorldFutureSoc – World Future Society
@rossdawson – Ross Dawson
@gleonhard – Gerd Leonhard
@DefTechPat – Patrick Tucker
@Urbanverse – Cindy Frewen
@VenessaMiemis – Venessa Miemis
@cshirky – Clay Shirky
@cascio – Jamais Cascio
@bruces – Bruce Sterling
@mitchbetts – Mitch Betts
@frankspencer – Frank Spencer
@futuryst – Stuart Candy
@johnmsmart – John Smart
@Geofutures – Josh Calder
@ThomasFrey – Thomas Frey
@doctorow – Cory Doctorow
@heathervescent – Heather Schlegel
@psaffo – Paul Saffo
@MareeConway – Maree Conway
@dunagan23 – Jake Dunagan
@jenjarratt – Jennifer Jarratt
@kevin2kelly – Kevin Kelly
@wendyinfutures – Wendy L Schultz
@patrickdixon – Patrick Dixon
@Joi – Joi Ito
@GreatDismal – William Gibson
@futuristpaul – Paul Higgins
@futuramb – P A Martin Börjesson
@kristinalford – Kristin Alford
@nraford – Noah Raford
@avantgame – Jane McGonigal
@DavidBrin – David Brin
@jhagel – John Hagel
@fastfuture – Rohit Talwar
@singularityhub – Singularity Hub
@singularityu – SingularityU
@futureguru – Dr. James Canton
@timeguide – Ian Pearson
@FutureCon – Future Conscience



Read more: http://rossdawson.com/articles/futurists-twitter-analysis-network-centrality/#ixzz3BrJtP4IX

Sep 1
emergentfutures:

Here’s why Apple bought Beats: By 2019, streaming will account for 70 percent of digital music revenue


Here’s another reminder why companies like Apple and Amazon are betting on streaming services: Streaming is quickly taking over as the major money-maker for the music industry, with 70 percent of all digital music revenue coming from streaming by 2019, according to an estimate from U.K.-based digital music analyst Mark Mulligan.

Full Story: GigaOm

emergentfutures:

Here’s why Apple bought Beats: By 2019, streaming will account for 70 percent of digital music revenue

Here’s another reminder why companies like Apple and Amazon are betting on streaming services: Streaming is quickly taking over as the major money-maker for the music industry, with 70 percent of all digital music revenue coming from streaming by 2019, according to an estimate from U.K.-based digital music analyst Mark Mulligan.

Full Story: GigaOm

Sep 1
emergentfutures:

Google tests prototype drone in Queensland; Warwick farmer has dog food, chocolate delivered


Google’s prototype drone delivery system, Project Wing, has been successfully tested in Queensland, with a Warwick farmer the first to place an order - for dog food and chocolate.
Project Wing was developed by Google X, a major technological advancement facility owned by the search engine giant.
It has taken two years to get to test phase, which the developers chose to carry out on the Darling Downs.

Full Story: ABC

emergentfutures:

Google tests prototype drone in Queensland; Warwick farmer has dog food, chocolate delivered

Google’s prototype drone delivery system, Project Wing, has been successfully tested in Queensland, with a Warwick farmer the first to place an order - for dog food and chocolate.

Project Wing was developed by Google X, a major technological advancement facility owned by the search engine giant.

It has taken two years to get to test phase, which the developers chose to carry out on the Darling Downs.

Full Story: ABC

Sep 1
science-sexual:

milktree:

the fibonacci sequence engraved on grass

YEs please thank you

science-sexual:

milktree:

the fibonacci sequence engraved on grass

YEs please thank you

(Source: ummhello)

Sep 1
astrodidact:

Three years ago, researchers fired whisky to the International Space Station as part of an experiment to see how the conditions in space change flavours. Next month, the whisky will return to Earth.

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20143108-26097-2.html

astrodidact:

Three years ago, researchers fired whisky to the International Space Station as part of an experiment to see how the conditions in space change flavours. Next month, the whisky will return to Earth.

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20143108-26097-2.html
Sep 1

cas-thelittlelionman:

leanaisnotabanana:

Rethink, Science World is well known in Canada to award-winning and eye catching advertisements that educate the public.

now when someone asks me if im allergic to anything i can validly say mosquito spit.

Sep 1

ticytacs:

ladyinterior:

Paper Art, Maude White

and I didn’t want to cut out bat silhouettes 

Sep 1

sararye:

every 1st september we joke about getting ready for hogwarts to cover up the very real and very very deep scars of never getting our letters

Sep 1
mindblowingscience:

Indian start-up launches shoes that show you the way

"Wizard of Oz" heroine Dorothy only had to click her ruby red slippers together and they would spirit her home to Kansas.
Now, an Indian high-tech start-up is promising to do the same in real life with a new, GPS-enabled smart sports shoe that vibrates to give the wearer directions.
The fiery red sneakers, which will also count the number of steps taken, distance travelled and calories burned, will go on sale in September under the name LeChal, which means “take me along” in Hindi.
The shoes come with a detachable Bluetooth transceiver that links to a smartphone app to direct the wearer using Google maps, sending a vibrating signal to indicate a left or right turn.
They are the brainchild of 30-year-old Krispian Lawrence and Anirudh Sharma, 28, two engineering graduates who founded their tech start-up Ducere in a small apartment in 2011 with backing from angel investors and now employ 50 people.
"We got this idea and realised that it would really help visually challenged people, it would work without any audio or physical distractions," said Lawrence in an interview with AFP.
"But then we were trying it out on ourselves and suddenly we were like, ‘wait a minute, even I would want this,’ because it felt so liberating not having to look down at your phone or being tied to anything."
"The footwear works instinctively. Imagine if someone taps your right shoulder, your body naturally reacts to turn right, and that’s how LeChal works."

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Indian start-up launches shoes that show you the way

"Wizard of Oz" heroine Dorothy only had to click her ruby red slippers together and they would spirit her home to Kansas.

Now, an Indian high-tech start-up is promising to do the same in real life with a new, GPS-enabled smart sports shoe that vibrates to give the wearer directions.

The fiery red sneakers, which will also count the number of steps taken, distance travelled and calories burned, will go on sale in September under the name LeChal, which means “take me along” in Hindi.

The shoes come with a detachable Bluetooth transceiver that links to a smartphone app to direct the wearer using Google maps, sending a vibrating signal to indicate a left or right turn.

They are the brainchild of 30-year-old Krispian Lawrence and Anirudh Sharma, 28, two engineering graduates who founded their tech start-up Ducere in a small apartment in 2011 with backing from angel investors and now employ 50 people.

"We got this idea and realised that it would really help visually challenged people, it would work without any audio or physical distractions," said Lawrence in an interview with AFP.

"But then we were trying it out on ourselves and suddenly we were like, ‘wait a minute, even I would want this,’ because it felt so liberating not having to look down at your phone or being tied to anything."

"The footwear works instinctively. Imagine if someone taps your right shoulder, your body naturally reacts to turn right, and that’s how LeChal works."

Continue Reading.

Sep 1
fuckyeahendocrinology:

Systemic Corticosteroids and Their Effects on Adrenal Function
Recently while studying conditions of the lungs such as asthma and COPD, the long-term use of systemic corticosteroids came up. As we know, asthma is characterized by inflammation in the bronchioles and acute exacerbations of COPD can also be triggered by inflammation and so often, systemic corticosteroids can be used to combat this.

However, an issue arises when, primarily asthmatics, are prescribed a systemic corticosteroid to be taken over a period longer than a week or two. Because of the feedback mechanism employed when the release of ACTH is suppressed due to the steroid, the adrenal glands are worked less and as a result, may tend to shrink. This causes an issue for patients who are then removed from their corticosteroid. 

It’s important that if a patient is on a long-term course of systemic corticosteroids and their doctor chooses to discontinue the medication, that it’s tapered off instead of cut off entirely at once. Doing this allows the adrenals to pick up work again and makes the transition off of steroids easier and safer for the patient. 

fuckyeahendocrinology:

Systemic Corticosteroids and Their Effects on Adrenal Function

Recently while studying conditions of the lungs such as asthma and COPD, the long-term use of systemic corticosteroids came up. As we know, asthma is characterized by inflammation in the bronchioles and acute exacerbations of COPD can also be triggered by inflammation and so often, systemic corticosteroids can be used to combat this.

However, an issue arises when, primarily asthmatics, are prescribed a systemic corticosteroid to be taken over a period longer than a week or two. Because of the feedback mechanism employed when the release of ACTH is suppressed due to the steroid, the adrenal glands are worked less and as a result, may tend to shrink. This causes an issue for patients who are then removed from their corticosteroid. 

It’s important that if a patient is on a long-term course of systemic corticosteroids and their doctor chooses to discontinue the medication, that it’s tapered off instead of cut off entirely at once. Doing this allows the adrenals to pick up work again and makes the transition off of steroids easier and safer for the patient. 

Sep 1
starstuffblog:

Researchers map quantum vortices inside superfluid helium nanodroplets
First ever snapshots of spinning nanodroplets reveal surprising features Scientists have, for the first time, characterized so-called quantum vortices that swirl within tiny droplets of liquid helium. The research, led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the University of Southern California, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, confirms that helium nanodroplets are in fact the smallest possible superfluidic objects and opens new avenues to study quantum rotation.
"The observation of quantum vortices is one of the most clear and unique demonstrations of the quantum properties of these microscopic objects," says Oliver Gessner, senior scientist in the Chemical Sciences Division at Berkeley Lab. Gessner and colleagues, Andrey Vilesov of the University of Southern California and Christoph Bostedt of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory at Stanford, led the multi-facility and multi-university team that published the work this week in Science.
The finding could have implications for other liquid or gas systems that contain vortices, says USC’s Vilesov. “The quest for quantum vortices in superfluid droplets has stretched for decades,” he says. “But this is the first time they have been seen in superfluid droplets.” Superfluid helium has long captured scientist’s imagination since its discovery in the 1930s. Unlike normal fluids, superfluids have no viscosity, a feature that leads to strange and sometimes unexpected properties such as crawling up the walls of containers or dripping through barriers that contained the liquid before it transitioned to a superfluid.
Helium superfluidity can be achieved when helium is cooled to near absolute zero (zero kelvin or about -460 degrees F). At this temperature, the atoms within the liquid no longer vibrate with heat energy and instead settle into a calm state in which all atoms act together in unison, as if they were a single particle.
For decades, researchers have known that when superfluid helium is rotated—in a little spinning bucket, say—the rotation produces quantum vortices, swirls that are regularly spaced throughout the liquid. But the question remained whether anyone could see this behavior in an isolated, nanoscale droplet. If the swirls were there, it would confirm that helium nanodroplets, which can range in size from tens of nanometers to microns, are indeed superfluid throughout and that the motion of the entire liquid drop is that of a single quantum object rather than a mixture of independent particles.
But measuring liquid flow in helium nanodroplets has proven to be a serious challenge. “The way these droplets are made is by passing helium through a tiny nozzle that is cryogenically cooled down to below 10 Kelvin,” says Gessner. “Then, the nanoscale droplets shoot through a vacuum chamber at almost 200 meters-per-second. They live once for a few milliseconds while traversing the experimental chamber and then they’re gone. How do you show that these objects, which are all different from one another, have quantum vortices inside?”
The researchers turned to a facility at SLAC called the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a DOE Office of Science user facility that is the world’s first x-ray free-electron laser. This laser produces very short light pulses, lasting just a ten-trillionth of a second, which contain a huge number of high-energy photons. These intense x-ray pulses can effectively take snapshots of single, ultra-fast, ultra-small objects and phenomena.
"With the new x-ray free electron laser, we can now image phenomenon and look at processes far beyond what we could imagine just a decade ago," says Bostedt of SLAC. "Looking at the droplets gave us a beautiful glimpse into the quantum world. It really opens the door to fascinating sciences."
In the experiment, the researchers blasted a stream of helium nanodroplets across the x-ray laser beam inside a vacuum chamber; a detector caught the pattern that formed when the x-ray light diffracted off the drops.
The diffraction patterns immediately revealed that the shape of many droplets were not spheres, as was previously assumed. Instead, they were oblate. Just as the Earth’s rotation causes it to bulge at the equator, so too do rotating nanodroplets expand around the middle and flatten at the top and bottom.
But the vortices themselves are invisible to x-ray diffraction, so the researchers used a trick of adding xenon atoms to the droplets. The xenon atoms get pulled into the vortices and cluster together.
"It’s similar to pulling the plug in a bathtub and watching the kids’ toys gather in the vortex," says Gessner. The xenon atoms diffract x-ray light much stronger than the surrounding helium, making the regular arrays of vortices inside the droplet visible. In this way, the researchers confirmed that vortices in nanodroplets behave as those found in larger amounts of rotating superfluid helium.
Armed with this new information, the researchers were able to determine the rotational speed of the nanodroplets. They were surprised to find that the nanodroplets spin up to 100,000 times faster than any other superfluid helium sample ever studied in a laboratory.
Moreover, while normal liquid drops will change shape as they spin faster and faster—to resemble a peanut or multi-lobed globule, for instance—the researchers saw no evidence of such shapeshifting in the helium nanodroplets. “Essentially, we’re exploring a new regime of quantum rotation with this matter,” Gessner says.
"It’s a new kind of matter in a sense because it is a self-contained isolated superfluid," he adds. "It’s just all by itself, held together by its own surface tension. It’s pretty perfect to study these system
 IMAGE…This is an illustration of analysis of superfluid helium nanodroplets. Droplets are emitted via a cooled nozzle (upper right) and probed with x-ray from the free-electron laser. The multicolored pattern (upper left) represents a diffraction pattern that reveals the shape of a droplet and the presence of quantum vortices such as those represented in the turquoise circle with swirls (bottom center).
Credit: Felix P. Sturm and Daniel S. Slaughter, Berkeley Lab.

starstuffblog:

Researchers map quantum vortices inside superfluid helium nanodroplets

First ever snapshots of spinning nanodroplets reveal surprising features

Scientists have, for the first time, characterized so-called quantum vortices that swirl within tiny droplets of liquid helium. The research, led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the University of Southern California, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, confirms that helium nanodroplets are in fact the smallest possible superfluidic objects and opens new avenues to study quantum rotation.

"The observation of quantum vortices is one of the most clear and unique demonstrations of the quantum properties of these microscopic objects," says Oliver Gessner, senior scientist in the Chemical Sciences Division at Berkeley Lab. Gessner and colleagues, Andrey Vilesov of the University of Southern California and Christoph Bostedt of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory at Stanford, led the multi-facility and multi-university team that published the work this week in Science.

The finding could have implications for other liquid or gas systems that contain vortices, says USC’s Vilesov. “The quest for quantum vortices in superfluid droplets has stretched for decades,” he says. “But this is the first time they have been seen in superfluid droplets.”

Superfluid helium has long captured scientist’s imagination since its discovery in the 1930s. Unlike normal fluids, superfluids have no viscosity, a feature that leads to strange and sometimes unexpected properties such as crawling up the walls of containers or dripping through barriers that contained the liquid before it transitioned to a superfluid.

Helium superfluidity can be achieved when helium is cooled to near absolute zero (zero kelvin or about -460 degrees F). At this temperature, the atoms within the liquid no longer vibrate with heat energy and instead settle into a calm state in which all atoms act together in unison, as if they were a single particle.

For decades, researchers have known that when superfluid helium is rotated—in a little spinning bucket, say—the rotation produces quantum vortices, swirls that are regularly spaced throughout the liquid. But the question remained whether anyone could see this behavior in an isolated, nanoscale droplet. If the swirls were there, it would confirm that helium nanodroplets, which can range in size from tens of nanometers to microns, are indeed superfluid throughout and that the motion of the entire liquid drop is that of a single quantum object rather than a mixture of independent particles.

But measuring liquid flow in helium nanodroplets has proven to be a serious challenge. “The way these droplets are made is by passing helium through a tiny nozzle that is cryogenically cooled down to below 10 Kelvin,” says Gessner. “Then, the nanoscale droplets shoot through a vacuum chamber at almost 200 meters-per-second. They live once for a few milliseconds while traversing the experimental chamber and then they’re gone. How do you show that these objects, which are all different from one another, have quantum vortices inside?”

The researchers turned to a facility at SLAC called the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a DOE Office of Science user facility that is the world’s first x-ray free-electron laser. This laser produces very short light pulses, lasting just a ten-trillionth of a second, which contain a huge number of high-energy photons. These intense x-ray pulses can effectively take snapshots of single, ultra-fast, ultra-small objects and phenomena.

"With the new x-ray free electron laser, we can now image phenomenon and look at processes far beyond what we could imagine just a decade ago," says Bostedt of SLAC. "Looking at the droplets gave us a beautiful glimpse into the quantum world. It really opens the door to fascinating sciences."

In the experiment, the researchers blasted a stream of helium nanodroplets across the x-ray laser beam inside a vacuum chamber; a detector caught the pattern that formed when the x-ray light diffracted off the drops.

The diffraction patterns immediately revealed that the shape of many droplets were not spheres, as was previously assumed. Instead, they were oblate. Just as the Earth’s rotation causes it to bulge at the equator, so too do rotating nanodroplets expand around the middle and flatten at the top and bottom.

But the vortices themselves are invisible to x-ray diffraction, so the researchers used a trick of adding xenon atoms to the droplets. The xenon atoms get pulled into the vortices and cluster together.

"It’s similar to pulling the plug in a bathtub and watching the kids’ toys gather in the vortex," says Gessner. The xenon atoms diffract x-ray light much stronger than the surrounding helium, making the regular arrays of vortices inside the droplet visible. In this way, the researchers confirmed that vortices in nanodroplets behave as those found in larger amounts of rotating superfluid helium.

Armed with this new information, the researchers were able to determine the rotational speed of the nanodroplets. They were surprised to find that the nanodroplets spin up to 100,000 times faster than any other superfluid helium sample ever studied in a laboratory.

Moreover, while normal liquid drops will change shape as they spin faster and faster—to resemble a peanut or multi-lobed globule, for instance—the researchers saw no evidence of such shapeshifting in the helium nanodroplets. “Essentially, we’re exploring a new regime of quantum rotation with this matter,” Gessner says.

"It’s a new kind of matter in a sense because it is a self-contained isolated superfluid," he adds. "It’s just all by itself, held together by its own surface tension. It’s pretty perfect to study these system


IMAGE…This is an illustration of analysis of superfluid helium nanodroplets. Droplets are emitted via a cooled nozzle (upper right) and probed with x-ray from the free-electron laser. The multicolored pattern (upper left) represents a diffraction pattern that reveals the shape of a droplet and the presence of quantum vortices such as those represented in the turquoise circle with swirls (bottom center).

Credit: Felix P. Sturm and Daniel S. Slaughter, Berkeley Lab.

Vaccines protect the health of children in the United States so well that most parents today have never seen first-hand the devastating consequences of diseases now stopped by vaccines

-

CDC statement

Sorry truthers, there is no CDC cover up and vaccines still don’t cause autism 

(via real-justice-waluigi)

(Source: micdotcom)

madlori:

jmathieson-fic:

mumblingsage:

decodethefallenmoon:

molokoko:

amazing

“Just so everyone is aware, there is a bunch of misleading info being spread around re: ALS research - the “27%” figure is based on previous years’ annual funding; furthermore, the remainder goes to improving the quality of life of those suffering from ALS. Given that the annual funding is approximately 16M, that’s just over 4M spent on decreasing their suffering. It isn’t greed, it’s a lack of money.”Shut up already.

The ALS Association has a 4-star rating from Charity Watchdog. 
And the next time you start to complain about a charity either a) working on multiple fronts (because that’s what ALSA does—both seeking a cure and helping people suffering now) or b) daring to have administration expenses—let’s see how long you can last, much less tackle a cause, without printer paper and an internet connection. 

As someone who has watched a family member die from a neuro-degenerative disease; funding to develop better wheelchairs and bedsore creams is *just* as important as funding research to cure the disease itself…

A friend of mine posted an update from one of HER friends to FB earlier.  Her dad has ALS.  The ALS foundation came out to see if they could put in a ramp for his wheelchair, but they couldn’t afford it because of the kind of ramp he needed for the kind of house they had.
This week they called back and said hey, the thing is, we suddenly have a bunch of money, so we’re coming out to build that ramp.  And they did.  She posted pics.
So if you feel like bitching about the ice bucket challenge…reconsider.

madlori:

jmathieson-fic:

mumblingsage:

decodethefallenmoon:

molokoko:

amazing

Just so everyone is aware, there is a bunch of misleading info being spread around re: ALS research - the “27%” figure is based on previous years’ annual funding; furthermore, the remainder goes to improving the quality of life of those suffering from ALS. Given that the annual funding is approximately 16M, that’s just over 4M spent on decreasing their suffering. It isn’t greed, it’s a lack of money.”

Shut up already.

The ALS Association has a 4-star rating from Charity Watchdog. 

And the next time you start to complain about a charity either a) working on multiple fronts (because that’s what ALSA does—both seeking a cure and helping people suffering now) or b) daring to have administration expenses—let’s see how long you can last, much less tackle a cause, without printer paper and an internet connection. 

As someone who has watched a family member die from a neuro-degenerative disease; funding to develop better wheelchairs and bedsore creams is *just* as important as funding research to cure the disease itself…

A friend of mine posted an update from one of HER friends to FB earlier.  Her dad has ALS.  The ALS foundation came out to see if they could put in a ramp for his wheelchair, but they couldn’t afford it because of the kind of ramp he needed for the kind of house they had.

This week they called back and said hey, the thing is, we suddenly have a bunch of money, so we’re coming out to build that ramp.  And they did.  She posted pics.

So if you feel like bitching about the ice bucket challenge…reconsider.